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ACEER Receives Peru’s Top Environmental Education Award
ACEER has received Peru’s National Award of Environmental Citizenship for its environmental education programs promoting conservation of the Amazon Rainforest.
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Ese Eja Culture
Preserving The Ese’Eja Culture
ACEER is collaborating with the National Geographic Society and the University of Delaware to help the Ese’Eja people of Peru preserve their culture.
Watch this video to see how.
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Coffee280
Coffee Partnership to Fund Conservation in the Peruvian Amazon
...a major collaboration to foster sustainable coffee development in the Amazon Basin providing consumers with 100% Peruvian, 100% organic, 100% shade grown, and certified bird friendly coffee.
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JamesDuke280
CALL FOR APPLICATIONS - James Duke Ethnobotanical Fellowship
ACEER invites applications for the 2014 James A. Duke Ethnobotanical Fellowship. Two $1,000 research fellowships will be awarded. The deadline for applications is November 1, 2014.
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Latest News
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Turning point for Peru's forests?
From the Andes to the Amazon, Peru houses some of the world's most spectacular forests. Proud and culturally-diverse indigenous tribes inhabit the interiors of the Peruvian Amazon, including some that have chosen little contact with the outside world.
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BaleFishNews
Andrew Bale captures Ese'Eja culture for National Geographic-sponsored project
Andrew Bale journeyed to Peru's jungles to capture images for a National Geographic-funded project to map the Ese'Eja's culture. The project aims to enable Ese'Eja society to reclaim ancestral lands from the Peruvian government.
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Forest Lost Map 350
Peru's Most Important Forests Felled
Paradise being lost: Peru's most important forests felled for timber, crops, roads, mining.

Peru lost nearly a quarter-million hectares of forest over 12 years.
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Carbon Observatory 350
Peru's First-Ever Carbon Map Could Help The World Breathe Easier
The Carnegie Airborne Observatory imaged this fragmented Amazonian landscape. The largest trees, and thus the highest carbon stocks, are shown in red.
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